Yoga in the City

Hi,

My name is Linda, I’m Italian and I’m a Yoga Teacher.

I have been practicing Yoga for many years, never constantly, but Yoga has always been a part of my life since I was 20. It has slowly become my everyday lifestyle. It affects most of my daily decisions: from the groceries I buy, to the food I cook, people I meet, mood I’m in, clothes I wear…. It started being my personal compass.

When I moved to Cape Town last year I signed up for a yoga teacher training course at Yoga Life Studio in De Waterkant. It wasn’t easy, especially from an emotional point of you, but it was worth the challenge. Yoga makes me a happier, healthier and stronger person. It’s what connects me to myself. It’s the light I look for when I’m lost & confuse.

Through Yoga I want to bring the same magic to as many people as possible.

I also believe everyone should have access to it.

I teach yoga at my home in Cape Town, organize private yoga events and collaborate with local NGOs to bring Yoga to disadvantaged communities in the Western Cape.

I’m currently also busy creating a Travel Company that Specializes in Yoga retreats around the word.

For more updates you can check my Website or my Facebook page:

 

https://www.facebook.com/Ocean-View-Yoga-547281795316573/

http://lindateruzzi.wix.com/oceanviewyoga

How to stay trim over Christmas

Prepare yourself for the holiday season! The run-up to Christmas is often a time for endless party nibbles, alcohol and lack of exercise…

The sooner you try out these tips, the more prepared you will be for the holiday foods.

1.   Exercise 
Give yourself the gift of 30 minutes of exercise a day. In addition to burning calories, exercise also helps to relieve tension – so you are less likely to eat to control holiday stress.

2.    Stay hydrated! 
A little water goes a long way – small sips throughout the day is a smart way to keep well hydrated. Even better, water has no fat, no calories and no cholesterol 🙂

3.   Portion Alert! 
Try to keep your portions small and make only one visit to the table. Choose the smallest plate possible. Pile greens and other tasty veggies on your plate first, leaving just a little room for those high-calorie treats like sweets and cheeses. Eat small, lower-calorie meals during the day so you can enjoy a special treat later – just make sure you do not starve yourself for the party and overeat later.

4.    Step away from the table 
If you don’t put your choices on a plate, you have no idea how much you are really eating. The worst thing you can do at a party is stand around the table dipping into the bowl.

5.   
 Drink smart 
Alcohol is a double whammy during the holidays.  It tends to weaken your resistance when it comes to eating, and the calories in drinks add up quickly.

6.    Zen Yourself
Holidays can be stressful. Keep expectations for the holiday season manageable. Organise your time and make a list and prioritise the important activities. Be realistic about what you can and cannot do. And don’t forget to schedule some down time to relax.

7.    Slip, don’t slide
If you eat three helpings of mashed potatoes and half a pie, all is not lost.  Rather than polishing off the rest, learn from your slip-up. Next time, eat a salad first, start a conversation, and park yourself far from the danger zone. The next time starts today.

 

Remember to avoid missing meals in the busy period running up to Christmas. This easily leads to overeating, when you’re faced with temptation.

 

ENJOY THE FESTIVE SEASON 🙂

Healthy Starches

A lot of people are confused about carbohydrates and are unsure of how to work them into a healthy diet and this can be so frustrating!

So to put the confusion to rest…Carbs can be divided into complex carbs and simple carbs. Simple carbs, such as white bread and flours, are processed foods that are stripped of their nutrients, wheat germ and bran during the refining process. They offer little nutrition, are low in dietary fibre and are a source of refined simple sugars.

In contrast, complex carbs retain their nutrients, wheat germ, bran and the kernel. They are a source of dietary fibre and are digested more slowly in the body, they also provide vitamins, minerals and are important to the health of an individual. The majority of carbohydrates should come from complex carbohydrates (starches) and naturally occurring sugars, rather than processed or refined sugars.

The table below illustrates great sources of complex carbs that can be incorporated into your healthy diet.

COMPLEX CARBS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See links below to recipes that incorporates healthy starches into your healthy meal plan 🙂 

BREAKFAST:

Birchers Muesli

Banana oat pancakes

LUNCH:

Quinoa chickpea and everything nice salad

Lentil & Beetroot salad topped with caramelized onions

DINNER:

Chickpea and vegetable curry

Butternut aubergine bake with a garlic herb vinaigrette

ENJOY 🙂

All About Fibre

We have all heard about FIBRE but do you know what fibre actually is?

Fibre is found in plant foods and there are 2 main types you have probably heard of; soluble and insoluble fibres.

 

Soluble fibre is the soft fibre that helps control blood glucose (sugar) and reduces cholesterol. It also helps in managing diarrhea. Soluble fibre is found in oat bran, oatmeal, legumes (dried beans and lentils) and fruits such as apples and strawberries.

Insoluble fibre is the bulky fibre that helps to prevent constipation and helps to speed up the time it takes to remove waste from the colon. It is found in wheat bran, whole grain breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables.

*Many foods contain both soluble and insoluble fibre.

IF you still need more convincing, here is why fibre is good for you 🙂 :

  • Controlling blood glucose (sugar)
  • Managing blood pressure (high blood pressure is also called hypertension)
  • Reducing blood cholesterol
  • Increasing the feeling of being full
  • Controlling weight
  • Regulating bowel movement

fibretips

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portion Control Guide

When it comes to losing weight and then keeping it off long term, it all comes down to portion sizes. It sounds so simple: don’t eat or drink too much, but it’s so easy to drink more than you planned to, without a doubt, most people struggle with this concept but today I will give you some tips to make life a little bit easier 🙂

 

Tips to control your portions:

At home

  • Buy yourself a set of measuring cups and have them handy.
  • Always measure breakfast cereal and rice/pasta servings using a measuring cup.
  • Keep kitchen scales handy to check portions and serving sizes.
  • Avoid eating in front of the TV, it is easy to overeat when you distracted.
  • Use grated cheese or invest in a cheese slice to control portions.
  • Only carry portion controlled snacks of nuts and crackers.
  • Cook at home more frequently!

At restaurants

  • Ask for half or smaller portions.
  • Eyeball your appropriate portion, set the rest aside, and ask for a doggie bag right away.

At the grocery store

  • Beware of mini-sized snacks – small crackers, cookies, and pretzels. Most people end up eating more than they realize, and the calories add up.
  • Choose foods packaged in individual serving sizes.

 

Now…when you don’t have measuring cups or a scale available, you can use your hands to figure out reasonable portion sizes…handguide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And if you still find this difficult to put into action…

e0b144de26eb9f84ebd267479f2761f4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That Sugar Film

I have just seen the Ozzie documentary called “That Sugar Film”. It’s excellent. It follows a 30-something guy who changes his diet to reflect that of the average Australian, who generally eats 44 teaspoons of sugar a day! Shocking! The scariest part is that this isn’t in the form of actual table sugar, it’s HIDDEN sugar. YES, that means that in many people’s daily diet lurks 44 teaspoons of refined, toxic sugar.

 

The physiology is really well depicted. It explains how sucrose is broken down into glucose and fructose. So when we flood our systems with sucrose from commercial products like fizzy drinks, sweetened dairy, cakes etc, our bodies metabolize the fructose in the liver where it gets stored as triglycerides. This is very harmful and is associated with an increased risk for heart and metabolic disease such as obesity, diabetes and even cancers.

 

It highlights the obvious changes (like dental cavities, weight gain and increased body fat) which become symptomatic after just 3 weeks! However the real value of this film is the way it shows the internal changes. This includes the increased triglyceride level, visceral fat (around the central organs), insulin and dopamine response triggering an addiction and psychological effects such depression. This film’s shock factor is huge!! But so is the effect of sugar 😉 it makes you think about every drop that you put into your mouth.

 

Remember: your body is your temple… You only have one chance at keeping it safe and healthy.

 

Sugar Addiction

Let’s talk about sugar and find out what you can do to kick your sugar habit and get your life back on track. Sugar is a carbohydrate found naturally in many foods from lactose in milk to the fructose in fruit and honey. In fact, we need some sugar in our diets to supply energy to fuel our muscles and keep our brains active.

The problem comes in where children and adults are consuming TOO MUCH sugar. Many processed foods have added sugar which supplies energy in the form of calories and very little else.  A high intake of sugar causes our blood sugar levels to shoot up, giving us that feel-good ‘high’ followed by a crashing which leaves us tired, irritable and craving more sugary foods. It’s a vicious cycle that may be contributing to our weight problems as well as health concerns like diabetes and heart disease.

 

Foods high in added sugar: cakes, biscuits, sweets, frozen desserts, fruit drinks, fizzy drinks, alcoholic drinks, chocolates, savoury foods.

sugar cycle

Making a few adjustments to your diet can help you cut down on unnecessary sugar consumption:

  • Reduce the sugar you add to hot drinks. Do this gradually to give your taste buds time to adjust. Try adding a sprinkle of cinnamon to cappuccino or hot chocolate, cinnamon adds flavour without the sweetness.
  • Be wary of ‘sugar-free’ foods. These often contain synthetic sweeteners like sucralose, saccharin and aspartame. Although these taste sweet, they don’t help curb a sweet tooth so they tend to send confusing messages to the brain, which can lead to over-eating.
  • Balance your carb intake with lean protein like fish and chicken- protein foods slow stomach emptying, which helps manage cravings.
  • Swap white bread, rice and pasta for wholegrain versions like oats, whole-wheat breads, brown rice, quinoa and pasta.
  • Reduce the sugar in recipes and add spices to boost flavour and taste.
  • For a pick me up, have a piece of whole fruit with a handful of nuts or a small tub of plain yogurt.

Health and Wellness in the workplace

Health and wellness in the workplace

Healthy and empowered employees are happier and more productive.

Healthy employees are efficient, take fewer sick days and are more productive in your company. The reverse is also true – it is recognized that the workplace itself has a powerful effect on people’s health. When people are satisfied with their job, they are more productive and tend to be healthier. When employees feel that the environment at work is , which has a large impact on employee mental and physical health, and in turn, on productivity.

We have done various health and wellness days including:

  • Presentations at Parliament and Transnet
  • Assessments and consultations at Mr Price, Milady’s, Mr Price Financial Services, Swiss Re, Shelll and OMD.

We have seen that a good workplace wellness program has an impact on employees’ mental, physical, emotional, social, and spiritual well-being, and of course productivity. It’s time to empower your employees with life-changing nutrition information.

benefits of wellness

 

Basics on how to lose weight (easily) 

Most people that walk through my door want to lose weight but feel like it’s an impossible task and huge mountain of a challenge. My job is to make weight loss achievable and yes, EASY!

The best trick is to make lifestyle changes that suit you and fit into your current routine. In this way you will see the kilograms shed with minimal effort.

Here are some basics to set you off on the right track. If you can start by following these 8 tips you will be leaps ahead.

  1. Cut out sugar in tea and coffee. Do yourself a favour and add up the teaspoons of sugar you have in a day. Remember that 3-4 tsp = 1 slice of bread.
  2. Cut out fruit juice and fizzy cool drinks. This is VITAL because most juices are laced with sugar. For example, Ice Tea can contain about 30g of sugar!
  3. Say no to high energy snacks like chocolate, muffins and sugary treats
  4. Limit alcohol. The body breaks down alcohol in the same way as it breaks down fat. The problem is that there is no ‘alcohol reservoir’. So the body needs to stop metabolising any other food and turns to burning the alcohol, storing the fat and carb that it was metabolising.
  5. Drink lots of water and herbal teas. This keeps you feeling full and ensures that the metabolism  is functioning well.
  6. Include a lean protein in most meals and snacks. Protein has an excellent effect of satiety and really helps tide you over until your next meal.
  7. If in doubt about portion control, only allow yourself one helping and try and leave 20% on your plate (and ask for a take away for lunch the next day)
  8. Exercise!!!

Good luck

Banting diaries

Eggs, almonds, salmon, avo, seeds, broccoli….. So many almonds 🙂
So how has the passed month of Royal-Banting been?

The pros:
I get to eat lots of almonds
I’m much less bloated
CHOLESTEROL- biggest bonus is my cholesterol has practically halved….now be careful here…this is associated with the ROYAL BANTING aspects which I will explain in my next post- very exciting!

The cons:
I slump my energy levels every so often but working on that with MCTs.
My weight is stable and not going down after the last measurement when I lost 2% body fat….but I’m quite sure I have over eaten the almonds :/
Socially, it is very difficult. Going out for dinner can be tricky, getting choccies from friends is too tempting and avoiding wine is a toughie, but definitely all possible.
Sport-wise: for Two Oceans I had a fatty meal the night before containing Salmon, lamb, chicken (plus the skin), almond and coconut pancakes and I was hundreds. For ..ITU I didn’t eat as much. Granted it was a harder and slightly longer race, I resorted to having half a gu and Jungle Oats bar. I find it hard to fuel during the race on nuts / Banting-friendly foods.
Cooking nice things like pancakes or crackers is a mission and quite expensive.

So in summary I have enjoyed certain aspects…and the great news is that myself with some friends are going to be making it a lot easier socially and for those sportsmen out there…WATCH THIS SPACE.