Chocolate Avocado Pudding Pops

Ingredients (8 small pops)

  • 2 ripe avocados
  • 6 tbsp almond or coconut milk (unsweetened)
  • 3 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • Pinch salt
  • 60g unsweetened chocolate, chopped
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil

 

Method

  1. Add avocado to a food processor (or a good blender) and puree on low until smooth, 3 to 4 minutes, scraping down sides with a rubber spatula as needed.
  2. Add in almond milk, honey, cocoa powder, vanilla and salt. Continue to process on low until well combined, scraping down sides as needed.
  3. In a microwave safe bowl, melt chocolate with coconut oil in 30 second increments on high, stirring until smooth.
  4. With processor running on low, pour chocolate mixture through pour spout and continue to process until well combined, scraping down sides as needed.
  5. Spoon half of the mixture into ice-cream molds and tap molds several times on counter to release air bubbles. Spoon remaining mixture into molds and tap again.
  6. Press wooden sticks about 2/3 into molds and freeze for at least 3 hours.
  7. To release the pops, run molds under hot water for about 30 seconds, then twist gently to release.

Why are seeds good for you?

Suddenly seeds are everywhere—bars, smoothies you name it. Seeds are nutritional powerhouses. It is always useful to know what seeds are better suited for certain tasks.  Just the same, when it comes to eating, particular seeds have standout flavours and many work all over the place. Lets get started 🙂

  1. Chia Seeds

Chia Seeds  are rich in fiber, omega 3 fats, protein, vitamins and minerals. Chia seeds provide much more Omega 3 than Omega 6, useful in keeping those omega ratios right to combat inflammation. They also blend quietly into foods, though they don’t add a distinctive flavour, making them excellent for smoothies. They can also be used to create an egg substitute in baking. Whole chia seeds also expand in liquid, they can give texture to juice, iced tea or smoothies.

 

  1. Flax Seeds

Flax seed benefits could help you improve digestion, give you clear skin, lower cholesterol, reduce sugar cravings … and that’s just the beginning! Flaxseeds, sometimes called linseeds, are small, brown, tan or golden-coloured seeds that are the richest sources of a plant-based omega-3 fatty acids, called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) in the world. Just be sure to use ground flax seeds, since the whole seeds will pass through the body without providing nutrients. Flax seeds keep better if you buy them whole, however, but can be ground in a coffee grinder or spice blender. Sprinkle the ground seeds on anything, including salads, smoothies, and baked veggies, as an egg-replacer, or even make them into crackers.

 

  1. Hemp Seeds

Hemp seeds are easily digested by the body and is one of the most nutritious foods available in nature. They contain high amounts of essential fatty acids, essential amino acids and proteins. A perfect 3:1 ratio of Omega-6 Linoleic Acid and Omega-3 Linolenic Acid – for cardiovascular health and general strengthening of the immune system. When it comes to eating hemp seeds, they add a nice, nutty background flavour and mild texture. They blend well in smoothies or oats.

 

  1. Pomegranate Seeds

Pomegranates are rich in vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. The majority of that fiber is found in the white seeds hiding beneath the pockets of juice. It contains 48% of the recommended daily vitamin C intake, important for a variety of health functions. Pomegranate seeds contain a high number of antioxidants, which help protect the body against inflammation and free radical damage. These seeds can be eaten as a snack or added to recipes when you’re looking for a burst of sweetness, such as oatmeal, salads, or in sweet and sour stir-fry. They can also be added to a fresh trail mix in place of raisins or quinoa dishes.

 

  1. Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkin seeds are nutritional powerhouses wrapped up in a very small package, with a wide variety of nutrients ranging from magnesium and manganese to copper, protein and zinc. They contain a wide array of beneficial plant compounds known as phytosterols and free-radical scavenging antioxidants, which can give your health an added boost. In order to preserve the healthy fats present in the seeds, pumpkin seeds should be eaten raw. Pumpkin seeds are a great snack on their own and also add a nice flavourful crunch to salad, pastas and breads, or they can be blended to accentuate smoothies.

 

  1. Quinoa

A complete protein and fantastic wheat-free alternative, the demand for quinoa has risen sharply in recent years but it’s also high in minerals, including: phosphorus, folate, copper, manganese, and magnesium. Quinoa is a great food to include for its high fiber content. Plus, it’s extremely versatile for cooking, standing in for grains like rice or oatmeal.

 

  1. Sunflower Seeds

The sunflower seed is the fruit of the sunflower. Sweet, nutty sunflower seeds are an excellent source of essential fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals. Sunflower kernels actually employed to extract edible oil at commercial levels. Besides being eaten as popular snacks, they are also used in the kitchen to prepare variety of recipes.

 

  1. Sesame Seeds

Sesame seeds add a nutty taste and a delicate, almost invisible, crunch to many Asian dishes. They are also the main ingredients in tahini (sesame seed paste). They are available throughout the year. They are also a good source of iron and calcium, and provide fiber that lower cholesterol and protect the heart.

Choco-banana overnight Oats

Ingredients (serves 1)

½ ripe banana, thinly sliced

½ cup rolled oats

1 tbsp bulgur wheat

1 tbsp chia seeds

1 tbsp organic cacao powder

1 cup boiling water

2 tbsp chocolate flavoured whey protein powder (optional)

¼ cup milk of your choice

Optional Garnish

1 tbsp cacao nibs

Fresh coconut shavings

 

Method

The previous night

  1. Bring water to a boil. Meanwhile, in a plastic container with a fitting lid, mix all ingredients except for protein powder and milk.
  2. Add boiling water, stir until well combined. Put the lid on and refrigerate overnight (or at least 4 hours)

In the morning

  1. Stir in protein powder.
  2. Transfer to serving bowl and add milk.
  3. Garnish with a few cacao nibs, slices of banana or coconut shavings, if desired.
  4. Sit back and prepare to visit heaven!

exchanges: 1/2 fruit , 1.5 starch, 2 fats, 1/2 milk

10 Prebiotic Foods You Should Eat For Digestive Health

Prebiotics are types of dietary fibre that feed the friendly bacteria in your gut which leads to a healthy digestive system.

 

Garlic

Garlic gives great flavour to your foods and provides you with prebiotic benefits. It has been shown to help promote good bacteria and prevent harmful bacteria from growing.

Onions

Onions are rich in inulin and FOS, which can help boost your immune system, provide fuel for your gut bacteria and improve digestion.

Leeks

Leeks are often used in cooking for their distinct flavour. They are high in prebiotic inulin fibre and vitamin K.

Asparagus

Asparagus is a spring vegetable rich in prebiotic fibre and antioxidants. It promotes healthy gut bacteria and may help prevent certain cancers.

Bananas

Bananas are rich in fibre. They’re also great at promoting healthy gut bacteria and reducing bloating.

Barley

Barley is high in beta-glucan fibre, which promotes healthy bacteria in the gut. It also seems to lower cholesterol and blood sugar levels.

Oats

Whole oats are a grain rich in beta-glucan fibre. They increase healthy gut bacteria, improve blood sugar control and may reduce cancer risk.

Apples

Apples are rich in pectin fibre. Pectin promotes healthy gut bacteria and helps decrease harmful bacteria. It also helps lower cholesterol and reduces cancer risk.

Flaxseed

The fibre in flaxseeds promotes regular bowel movements, lowers LDL cholesterol and reduces the amount of fat you digest and absorb.

Wheat bran

Wheat bran is rich in AXOS, a type of fibre that has been shown to increase healthy gut bacteria and reduce digestive problems.

 

Kirby’s Pantry

Here are 10 things to always keep in your pantry, these things are always in mine!

 

  • Healthy grains including brown rice, quinoa, and lentils
  • Healthy proteins: Turkey, chicken, salmon, sardines and eggs
  • Healthy Fats: Avocado, olives, coconut, oils (grape seed, olive, coconut, canola), seeds (chia, hemp, flax, pumpkin or sunflower seed)
  • Healthy snacks: Nuts, seeds or nut butters, lean biltong, boiled eggs and sardines
  • Fresh fruits including pomegranates, apples, pears, berries (raspberries, blueberries and blackberries!), passion fruit and avocado
  • Fresh veggies: My favourites include rainbow chard, asparagus, kale, arugula, beets, and cabbage
  • Fresh herbs like chives, parsley, coriander, rosemary and basil
  • Freezer must-haves including: Flash frozen nutrient dense veggies, frozen berries, and extra protein like fish and chicken
  • Pantry staples such as canned beans (chickpeas, kidney, and black), gluten-free minimally processed crackers, lean biltong
  • Tasty condiments, spices and sauces to add flavour and health to your best dishes: turmeric, sea salt, cayenne, curry powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, coriander, dried herbs, miso, kimchi, tamari

 

*Note: Try and keep it seasonal and buy what is available to you throughout the year.

Happy Shopping!

What to do with your fridge leftovers

Don’t throw out your leftovers, turn them into something delish 🙂

1. Lettuce leaves

  • Stir Fry

Lettuce can be used like cabbage in stir-fries (it does require less cooking). Finely shred and add to your stir-fry at the last minute for some crunch.

2. Two carrots

  • Carrot mash

Boil carrots with potatoes until soft and then mash together.

3. Fresh herbs

  • Herb bricks

Place chopped herbs in ice-cube trays and cover in oil. Freeze, then pop cubes into a freezer bag ad return to freezer. transfer a cube to the pan for a herb flavour bomb.

4. A cup of cooked rice

  • Rice salad

Fry cooked rice in spices of your choice. Cook until crispy, then toss with other salad ingredients such as peppers, mushrooms, celery to add texture and flavour.

Shrug off the Flu this winter

I write this while snuggling under my blanket in bed, nursing a cold. Some say it is inevitable that you will get a cold or flu during winter! This is not ideal in any way, shape or form! So to try avoid this I want to pass on some nutritional knowledge to keep you from ending up like me sniffing and spluttering.

The main way to avoid a cold this winter is to keep loaded with Vitamins and Minerals – eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables every day and healthy lean proteins. With vegetables, make sure they are different colours, as each colour contains a different phytonutrient (e.g. tomatoes with lycopene). Here’s a bit more detail:

  • Grapefruit: The Red or Pink ones are high in Vitamin C and contain bioflavonoids that give the immune system a big boost.
  • Cauliflower and Broccoli: cruciferous vegetables are high in antioxidants such as glutathione which helps to fight off infection. They also contain choline which keeps the cells functioning efficiently.
  • Carrots: are high in Beta-carotene which protect the mucous membranes of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract and prevent bacteria from crossing over into the blood stream causing infection.
  • Eggs: contain zinc, selenium and of course protein which boost immunity
  • Cinnamon: has been labelled an anti-fungal, anti-viral and anti-bacterial. These properties help keep disease at bay
  • Mushrooms: contain lots of zinc to boost immunity
  • Spinach and kale: are high in vitamin C and folate to prevent infection
  • Tomatoes and Watermelon: are high in lycopene that reduce respiratory inflammation and prevents infection
  • Yoghurt: contains probiotics that improves gut barrier preventing bacteria from entering the blood stream

See TIPS for practical ways to boost immunity!

Keep COSY!!

Yoga in the City

Hi,

My name is Linda, I’m Italian and I’m a Yoga Teacher.

I have been practicing Yoga for many years, never constantly, but Yoga has always been a part of my life since I was 20. It has slowly become my everyday lifestyle. It affects most of my daily decisions: from the groceries I buy, to the food I cook, people I meet, mood I’m in, clothes I wear…. It started being my personal compass.

When I moved to Cape Town last year I signed up for a yoga teacher training course at Yoga Life Studio in De Waterkant. It wasn’t easy, especially from an emotional point of you, but it was worth the challenge. Yoga makes me a happier, healthier and stronger person. It’s what connects me to myself. It’s the light I look for when I’m lost & confuse.

Through Yoga I want to bring the same magic to as many people as possible.

I also believe everyone should have access to it.

I teach yoga at my home in Cape Town, organize private yoga events and collaborate with local NGOs to bring Yoga to disadvantaged communities in the Western Cape.

I’m currently also busy creating a Travel Company that Specializes in Yoga retreats around the word.

For more updates you can check my Website or my Facebook page:

 

https://www.facebook.com/Ocean-View-Yoga-547281795316573/

http://lindateruzzi.wix.com/oceanviewyoga

How to stay trim over Christmas

Prepare yourself for the holiday season! The run-up to Christmas is often a time for endless party nibbles, alcohol and lack of exercise…

The sooner you try out these tips, the more prepared you will be for the holiday foods.

1.   Exercise 
Give yourself the gift of 30 minutes of exercise a day. In addition to burning calories, exercise also helps to relieve tension – so you are less likely to eat to control holiday stress.

2.    Stay hydrated! 
A little water goes a long way – small sips throughout the day is a smart way to keep well hydrated. Even better, water has no fat, no calories and no cholesterol 🙂

3.   Portion Alert! 
Try to keep your portions small and make only one visit to the table. Choose the smallest plate possible. Pile greens and other tasty veggies on your plate first, leaving just a little room for those high-calorie treats like sweets and cheeses. Eat small, lower-calorie meals during the day so you can enjoy a special treat later – just make sure you do not starve yourself for the party and overeat later.

4.    Step away from the table 
If you don’t put your choices on a plate, you have no idea how much you are really eating. The worst thing you can do at a party is stand around the table dipping into the bowl.

5.   
 Drink smart 
Alcohol is a double whammy during the holidays.  It tends to weaken your resistance when it comes to eating, and the calories in drinks add up quickly.

6.    Zen Yourself
Holidays can be stressful. Keep expectations for the holiday season manageable. Organise your time and make a list and prioritise the important activities. Be realistic about what you can and cannot do. And don’t forget to schedule some down time to relax.

7.    Slip, don’t slide
If you eat three helpings of mashed potatoes and half a pie, all is not lost.  Rather than polishing off the rest, learn from your slip-up. Next time, eat a salad first, start a conversation, and park yourself far from the danger zone. The next time starts today.

 

Remember to avoid missing meals in the busy period running up to Christmas. This easily leads to overeating, when you’re faced with temptation.

 

ENJOY THE FESTIVE SEASON 🙂

Healthy Starches

A lot of people are confused about carbohydrates and are unsure of how to work them into a healthy diet and this can be so frustrating!

So to put the confusion to rest…Carbs can be divided into complex carbs and simple carbs. Simple carbs, such as white bread and flours, are processed foods that are stripped of their nutrients, wheat germ and bran during the refining process. They offer little nutrition, are low in dietary fibre and are a source of refined simple sugars.

In contrast, complex carbs retain their nutrients, wheat germ, bran and the kernel. They are a source of dietary fibre and are digested more slowly in the body, they also provide vitamins, minerals and are important to the health of an individual. The majority of carbohydrates should come from complex carbohydrates (starches) and naturally occurring sugars, rather than processed or refined sugars.

The table below illustrates great sources of complex carbs that can be incorporated into your healthy diet.

COMPLEX CARBS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See links below to recipes that incorporates healthy starches into your healthy meal plan 🙂 

BREAKFAST:

Birchers Muesli

Banana oat pancakes

LUNCH:

Quinoa chickpea and everything nice salad

Lentil & Beetroot salad topped with caramelized onions

DINNER:

Chickpea and vegetable curry

Butternut aubergine bake with a garlic herb vinaigrette

ENJOY 🙂