Quinoa with roasted pumpkin, zucchini and basil pesto

Ingredients

Serves 4

  • 600 g pumpkin  cut into large chunks
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 red onion, cut into wedges
  • 6 baby zucchini, sliced
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa
  • 1 lemon
  • Small bunch parsley chopped
  • 1 – 2 tablespoons pesto depending on your taste

Method

 

  1. Preheat oven to 200 C.
  2. Combine pumpkin and red onion with a little olive oil.
  3. Season with ground pepper and a little cinnamon.
  4. Roast for 30 – 40 minutes or until pumpkin is tender.
  5. Sauté the zucchini lightly in a pan over the stove.  You don’t really want to roast this as they only take 2 – 3 minutes to quickly cook in a pan. Season lightly and set aside.
  6. Remove vegetables from the oven.
  7. Add the quinoa, zucchini, parsley and pesto. Taste and add adjust accordingly.

Serve as is or garnish with garden herbs, and feta.

Roasted Maple Sprouts with Hazelnuts

Ingredients

Serves 4 as a side dish

  • 200g of brussel sprouts
  • sweet potato (200g)
  • 50g of blanched hazelnuts
  • 100g of pomegranates
  • 2 tablespoon of maple syrup (Optional)
  • 1/2 a teaspoon of chilli flakes

Method:

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 180C
  2. Slice the sprouts in half and then the sweet potato into eights (you want the sweet potatoes to be roughly the same size as the sprouts)
  3. Place the sprouts and sweet potatoes in a baking dish. Sprinkle the chilli flakes, salt and pepper over them and the drizzle them with olive oil
  4. Let them cook for about thirty minutes, until they start to go a golden brown. Then take them out and add the hazelnuts before placing the tray back into the oven for another 8-10 minutes, so that the hazelnuts turn a golden brown too
  5. Remove the tray from the oven, drizzle the maple syrup over the brussel and sweet potato mix and stir in the pomegranates and enjoy!

 

Exchanges:

1 serving = 2 cups = 2 veg, ½ cup starch, 1 fat, ½ cup fruit

Inspired by Deliciously Ella 🙂

Healthy Starches

A lot of people are confused about carbohydrates and are unsure of how to work them into a healthy diet and this can be so frustrating!

So to put the confusion to rest…Carbs can be divided into complex carbs and simple carbs. Simple carbs, such as white bread and flours, are processed foods that are stripped of their nutrients, wheat germ and bran during the refining process. They offer little nutrition, are low in dietary fibre and are a source of refined simple sugars.

In contrast, complex carbs retain their nutrients, wheat germ, bran and the kernel. They are a source of dietary fibre and are digested more slowly in the body, they also provide vitamins, minerals and are important to the health of an individual. The majority of carbohydrates should come from complex carbohydrates (starches) and naturally occurring sugars, rather than processed or refined sugars.

The table below illustrates great sources of complex carbs that can be incorporated into your healthy diet.

COMPLEX CARBS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See links below to recipes that incorporates healthy starches into your healthy meal plan 🙂 

BREAKFAST:

Birchers Muesli

Banana oat pancakes

LUNCH:

Quinoa chickpea and everything nice salad

Lentil & Beetroot salad topped with caramelized onions

DINNER:

Chickpea and vegetable curry

Butternut aubergine bake with a garlic herb vinaigrette

ENJOY 🙂

Oat and Fruit Bars

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 1/2 cup dried apricots, chopped
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries
  • 1/2 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup dates, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon flax seed, ground
  • 1/2 cup coconut flakes, unsweetened
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 bananas, mashed
  • nonstick cooking spray
  • Stevia (optional)

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees C.
  2. In a food processor, add the coconut, banana, flaxseed, cinnamon, vanilla, baking soda and tahini. If using stevia, add it now. Process until smooth.
  3. Add chopped dates a little at a time until smooth.
  4. Remove mixture from processor and place in a bowl.
  5. To the bowl add chopped apricots, cherries, 1/4 cup sunflower seeds (save 1/4 cup seeds for top), and oats and mix well.
  6. Line a 9 x 13 casserole dish with parchment paper. Spray the paper with nonstick cooking spray.
  7. Pour the batter onto the parchment paper and spread out touching edges of dish all around as best you can.
  8. Sprinkle the top with 1/4 of reserved sunflower seeds.
  9. Bake 15-18 minutes until a toothpick in center comes out fairly clean.
  10. Let stand 10 minutes before cutting into bars.

Gluten & Sugar free Coco Nutty Granola

10 Servings

Ingredients

  • 3 cups coconut flakes
  • 2 cups mixed almonds, cashews, pecans, walnuts and pumpkin seeds
  • 2 tablespoons chia seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup raw cacao powder
  • 2 tablespoons cacao nibs
  • 1/2 cup Greek-style yoghurt or unsweetened coconut yoghurt, to serve.

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 120ºC  and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Combine all ingredients (except yoghurt), then spread evenly on the tray.
  3. Bake for about 20-25 minutes until golden, turning halfway through the cooking time. The darker it is, the crunchier it will be.
  4. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.
  5. Store it in an airtight container in the pantry for up to 2 weeks (or in the freezer for even longer!).
  6. To serve, spoon the yoghurt into a glass jar or bowl and top with 1/2 cup of granola.

Courtesy of Sarah Wilson from I Quit Sugar 

Vanilla Almond Chia Pudding

Curtesy of DailyBurn.com

1 serving

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1/4 cup chia seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoons raw honey or 1/2 tsp xylitol
  • blueberries, sliced peaches or sliced banana
  • Almonds or crushed pecan nuts

Method

  1. Combine milk, chia, vanilla and sweetener in a bowl
  2. Chill in a container for at least one hour
  3. Serve topped with berries or fruit and almonds

All About Fibre

We have all heard about FIBRE but do you know what fibre actually is?

Fibre is found in plant foods and there are 2 main types you have probably heard of; soluble and insoluble fibres.

 

Soluble fibre is the soft fibre that helps control blood glucose (sugar) and reduces cholesterol. It also helps in managing diarrhea. Soluble fibre is found in oat bran, oatmeal, legumes (dried beans and lentils) and fruits such as apples and strawberries.

Insoluble fibre is the bulky fibre that helps to prevent constipation and helps to speed up the time it takes to remove waste from the colon. It is found in wheat bran, whole grain breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables.

*Many foods contain both soluble and insoluble fibre.

IF you still need more convincing, here is why fibre is good for you 🙂 :

  • Controlling blood glucose (sugar)
  • Managing blood pressure (high blood pressure is also called hypertension)
  • Reducing blood cholesterol
  • Increasing the feeling of being full
  • Controlling weight
  • Regulating bowel movement

fibretips